US soldier freed in Afghanistan, five Taliban prisoners leave Guantanamo

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A handout image released by IntelCenter showing captured US Army soldier Bowe Bergdahl (L) with a Taliban commander (R) in a video released by the Taliban in 2010. Photo: EFE / EPA
A US soldier captured nearly five years ago in Afghanistan was freed Saturday in exchange for five Taliban inmates held at the Guantanamo prison in a dramatic deal brokered by Qatar.
U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl’s nearly five-year captivity ended Saturday evening local time when about 18 heavily armed Taliban fighters handed him over to American Special Forces troops. Officials say the transfer on the outskirts of Khost province took place quickly and peacefully, monitored by U.S. aircraft.
Bergdahl underwent a preliminary medical checkup at a U.S. base in Afghanistan Saturday, before a flight to a U.S. military hospital in Landstuhl, Germany.
Hours after the release, President Barack Obama, who hosted Bergdahl\’s parents at the White House, thanked Qatari and Afghan diplomats for their "tireless efforts" to gain Bergdahl\’s release (see full transcript of Rose Garden statement).
President Obama spoke alongside Bob and Jani Bergdahl, saying Qatar has given assurances that the release of the five insurgents to Doha will not jeopardize U.S. national security.
According to Pentagaon officials, the exchange follows secret and indirect U.S.-Taliban negotiations mediated by Qatar, which will host the detainees. The detainees will be barred from leaving Qatar for at least one year.
Bergdahl, of the U.S. state of Idaho, was captured by the Taliban on June 30, 2009 — about two months after he arrived in Afghanistan.
President Barack Obama broke the news of Bergdahl\’s release Saturday, calling the soldier\’s recovery "a reminder of America’s unwavering commitment to leave no man or woman in uniform behind on the battlefield."
Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says the U.S. government "never forgot Sergeant Bergdahl, nor did we stop working to bring him back."
A senior U.S. defense official said once Bergdahl boarded the noisy helicopter taking him away from his ordeal, he wrote the letters "SF" on a paper plate, followed by a question mark, as a way of asking the troops if they were U.S. special forces.
Over the roar of the helicopter, they replied, "Yes, we\’ve been looking for you for a long time." The official says at that point, Bergdahl broke down in tears, overcome with emotion.
Secretary of State John Kerry issued a statement calling the cost of Bergdahl\’s years of captivity to him and his family "immeasurable." Kerry spoke Saturday with Afghan President Hamid Karzai to brief him on Bergdahl\’s release.
Kerry, President Obama and Hagel also expressed appreciation to the emir of Qatar for his help in securing Bergdahl\’s transfer.
A Taliban spokesman, in a statement, confirmed the five senior commanders have been released from Guantanamo after 13 years of captivity and are due to arrive in Qatar Sunday.
President Obama made a quick visit to Afghanistan last Sunday to visit U.S. forces, and later in the week said he wants to keep 9,800 U.S. troops in Afghanistan after the combat mission closes at the end of the year.
Source: VOA and agencies

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