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US marks 50 years since Martin Luther King's 'I have a dream' speechWed, 28 Aug, 2013 | Posted By: The Times Of Earth (TOE)

US marks 50 years since Martin Luther King's 'I have a dream' speech President Barack Obama addresses crowds as nation marks anniversary of civil rights leader's iconic speech. EPA
U.S. President Barack Obama has linked the ongoing struggle for economic equality in America with the goals of the 1963 March on Washington, in a speech marking its 50th anniversary.

Obama, the nation's first black president, deliverws his remarks to tens of thousands of people attending the commemoration.

Obama said economic and political equality is "our great unfinished business".

The US president also linked his own rise to the White House with the efforts of civil rights protesters.

Civil rights leader Reverend Joseph Lowery was among those who spoke early in the day.  He said he is thankful the country has a president who understands the values expressed in Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech that capped the march 50 years ago.  But he said the work for civil rights continues.
 
"We ain't going back! " he exclaimed. "We have come too far, marched too long, prayed too hard, wept too bitterly, bled too profusely and died too young to let anybody turn back the clock on our journey to justice."
 
Former presidents Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton also spoke at Wednesday's anniversary observance.  
 
The Reverend Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech urged racial harmony and justice. It was hailed by historians as one of the greatest ever delivered. 
 
The 1963 "March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom" was held at the height of the American civil-rights movement that was aimed at ensuring the rights of all people are equally protected by the law.  The movement had faced strong and sometimes violent resistance to ending the practice of segregation that treated white and black Americans differently under the law.

Source: Agencies
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